10 Tips To Manage Childhood Obesity At Home

10 Tips To Manage Childhood Obesity At Home

Childhood obesity is a growing phenomenon worldwide. A child is considered to be obese when he or she has a body mass index in the 95th percentile.

This means that the child weighs more than 95 percent of other children of the same age and sex.

Obesity puts children at a higher risk of developing certain medical problems later in life. extra pounds can also lead to poor self-esteem and depression.

This article discusses the causes and symptoms of childhood obesity the complications and risk factors associated with the condition.

Childhood Obesity

Obesity and children is a serious medical condition. Childhood obesity puts children at risk for health problems like high cholesterol high blood pressure and diabetes, these problems were once limited to adults.

Today children have easy access to unhealthy foods. fast food candy and soda pop are readily available to children.

Obesity of your child will be evaluated by a physician by calculating the BMI or Body Mass Index of your child.

BMI indicates whether your child is overweight for his or her age and height. A child with a BMI at or above the 95th percentile is considered obese.

BMI does not consider things like being muscular or not. It does not account for larger than average body frames or growth patterns that may vary among children.

Children also engage in more low-level activities than children of the past like watching TV or playing video games.

Choosing these activities over activities that are more physically demanding such as sports puts children at risk for serious health problems.

Childhood obesity can be successfully prevented or treated by making certain lifestyle changes. improving a child’s diet and exercise habits can improve the health of your child.

Physical & Emotional Problems

Children who are obese are at risk for many health problems that were once limited to adults. Also, obese children also suffer from many physical & psychological issues. 

But you have to keep in mind that not every child who has extra pounds is overweight or obese. Some children may have larger body frames than an average child.

Children also have different amounts of body fat during different stages of their development.

Emotional Problems

There are many social and emotional problems associated with childhood obesity.

Social and emotional problems are also linked to childhood obesity like

Behavior problems

Depression,

Learning problems

Low self-esteem

In some cases aggressive attitude.

Physical Problems

Many physical problems are linked to childhood obesity. Some of the main physical problems are

Breathing problems

Asthma

High blood pressure

High cholesterol

Metabolic syndrome

Sleep disorders

Type-2 diabetes.

Causes Of Childhood Obesity

There are several possible causes of childhood obesity which include genetic causes, hormonal causes, lifestyle issues, certain genetic diseases, and hormonal disorders that can cause childhood obesity.

However, these conditions are not common more often than not childhood obesity is related to lifestyle issues.

Eating too much and exercising too little are the major causes of obesity and children’s risk factors.

Risk Factors

There are many factors that can increase your child’s risk of becoming overweight. Some common risk factors are:

Use Of High-Calorie Foods

The most common risk factors associated with childhood obesity if your child regularly eats foods that are high in calories they are at risk of gaining weight.

High-calorie foods include baked goods, fast food, and snacks from vending machines. These foods have extra sugar fat and calories.

Sedentary Activities

If your child does not exercise regularly he or she is more likely to gain extra weight. Exercise burns calories through physical activity.

Watching television playing video games and surfing the internet are sedentary activities. Children who regularly engage in these activities are at risk for childhood obesity.

Eating Habits Of Family

Eating habits of the family can affect your child’s weight. Buying foods that are convenient instead of healthy puts your child at risk for obesity.

Cookies, frozen, pizzas, and chips are high-calorie items.

Family History

A family history of obesity is another risk factor. Children who come from a family of overweight people are more likely to be overweight.

Certain psychological factors can put children at risk for childhood obesity. children may cope with emotional problems like stress or boredom.

Socioeconomic Factors

Socioeconomic factors have also been linked to childhood obesity. children who come from low-income backgrounds are more likely to be diagnosed with childhood obesity.

Eating healthy and exercising takes time energy and resources that some families do not have.

Choose A Child Physician For Diagnosis & Treatment

Your child’s healthcare provider can help you determine if your child’s weight puts him or her at risk for health problems.

Your child’s healthcare provider can then use a growth chart to determine how your child compares with other children of the same age and sex.

A child with a BMI at the 85th percentile weighs more than 85% of other children of the same age and sex. Your child’s healthcare provider will consider these factors when determining whether your child’s weight is it cause for concern.

Note
If you are worried about your child’s weight, talk to his or her health care provider. Your child’s health care provider can look at a number of different factors including your family’s weight for height history. This will help determine if your child’s weight is a cause for concern.

Diagnosis Of Childhood Obesity

There are many risk factors associated with childhood obesity diagnosis. Your child’s physician can help you determine if your child’s weight is it cause for concern.

Generally, the process of diagnosis of childhood obesity starts by checking your child’s body mass index or BMI. This indicates if your child is overweight for his or her age and height.

In addition to evaluating your child’s BMI, the physician will evaluate your family history of obesity and weight-related problems.

He or she will also evaluate your child’s activity level, diet, and eating habits.

Pre-existing health conditions during this time the healthcare provider will also review your child’s physical development and check his or her heart, lungs, blood pressure, and other vital signs.

If the health care provider believes your child is obese he or she may order some blood tests like blood sugar test, cholesterol test, other tests to check for hormone imbalances.

Some tests require your child to fast for up to eight hours before a test. Fasting means that your child cannot eat or drink anything.

The healthcare provider will let you know if your child needs to fast before a blood test.

Treatment Options

Treatment for childhood obesity depends on your child’s age and if he or she has other medical conditions. treatment often includes lifestyle changes. this may include changes to your child’s diet and level of physical activity.

Sometimes obesity and children will be treated with medications or weight-loss surgery however this is not common treatment for children under age 7.

Usually involves weight maintenance, not weight loss this allows the child to maintain his or her current weight. While adding inches in height over time this causes the child’s BMI to drop into a healthier range.

Weight loss

If there are some health concerns, the doctor may recommend weight loss for children seven years of age or older.

Weight loss should be slow and steady. Recommended weight loss is one pound per week or per month depending on the child’s condition.

Medication

Sometimes obesity is treated with weight-loss medication some children over the age of 12 may be prescribed medication that prevents fat from being absorbed in the intestines.

however prescription weight-loss medication is usually not recommended for children.

Children with high cholesterol will sometimes be treated with statin medication. these medications help lower cholesterol but their long-term side effects are unknown.

So discuss with your healthcare provider about the possible risks.

Weight-loss Surgery

Surgery is sometimes an option for obese children of a certain age. surgery of any kind comes with potential risks and complications.

Your child’s healthcare provider may choose to treat obesity with surgery if your child’s weight poses a larger threat than the risks of surgery.

Medication and surgery can provide relief from symptoms and conditions related to obesity however there is no replacement for healthy eating and being physically active.

Encouraging healthy habits at home is essential to your child’s well-being.

Lifestyle changes such as increasing physical activity reducing or maintaining weight and teaching healthy eating are all key to managing obesity.

10 Tips To Manage Childhood Obesity

You can have a major impact on your child’s health by making some small changes.

Avoid Junk Food & Snacks At Home

Avoid convenient foods cookies, potato chips, and prepared meals that are high in fat and sugar.

Instead, keep healthy snacks in your home inventory. Fruits and vegetables make excellent snacks. 

Stop Using Food As a Reward

Stop using chocolates, donuts, ice cream as a reward. It sends the wrong message about the purpose of food. Also, these are not healthy food options for your child.

Teach your child that healthy food is something the body needs. it is the fuel that keeps your child’s engine running.

Stop Sugary Drinks

Limit the number of sweetened drinks in your house. Sugary beverages like soda & other carbonated drinks.

Processed juice that is not 100% fruit juice provides very little nutritional value and they are high in calories.

A child who fills up on these drinks may not be hungry for healthier foods later in the day. 

Arrange Family Meals

Turn off the TV or computer and sit down to eat as a family during mealtime.

It regularizes the eating habits of your child.

Eating in front of the TV causes people to eat slower and for a longer period of time which is not a healthy way to take in calories.

Limit Outside Snacking

Limit the amount of food you eat outside of the home. This includes the number of times you eat at restaurants. Restaurant foods are in general not healthy.

The menu items at restaurants and fast-food chains are often high in fat and calories.

It also encourages your child to snack outside the home which is one of the major causes of childhood obesity.

Encourage Physical Activities

Encourage your child to be physically active and play sports. Any physical activity counts for weight loss. This will burn the extra fat and build strong muscles and bones.

Limit The Screen time Of Your Child

Limit the amount of recreational screen time your child. It should be no more than two hours each day.

This includes TV, movies, video games, internet surfing, and social networking sites.

Also, limit the amount of time your child gets to use the phone.

Discourage Eating While Doing Some Activities

Never allow your child to eat while he or she is engaged in activities that are not physically demanding.

If you allow your child to have snacks while playing video games or watching TV your child will be unaware of how much he or she is eating.

Don’t Implement Structured Exercise Schedule

Do not force your child into a structured exercise program. The goal is for your child to want to be physically active.

So activities have to be fun games like tag hide-and-seek or jump rope are great ways to burn calories to improve fitness and have fun.

This prevents exercise from looking like a punishment. Remember if you are excited about an activity your child will be too.

Summary

A child is considered to be obese when he or she has a body mass index in the 95th percentile. this means that the child weighs more than 95 percent of other children of the same age and sex.

Childhood obesity puts children at risk for health problems like high cholesterol high blood pressure and diabetes these problems were once limited to adults.

Extra pounds can also lead to poor self-esteem and depression. easy access to unhealthy foods and a decrease in physically demanding activities contribute to the steady rise in childhood obesity.

Treatment for childhood obesity depends on your child’s age and if he or she has other medical conditions. treatment often includes lifestyle changes that center around eating healthy and being more physically active.

In some cases, medication or weight loss surgery may be used to treat childhood obesity.

Conclusion

Encouraging healthy habits at home is essential to your child’s well-being.

Parents play a big role in a child’s habit. By role modeling good habits, you can help your child maintain a healthy weight.

Encouraging healthy habits at home is essential to your child’s well-being.

Lifestyle changes such as increasing physical activity reducing or maintaining weight and teaching healthy eating are all key to managing obesity.

Remember, the habits your child forms now will likely carry over into adulthood. With the help of little lifestyle changes, you can prevent childhood obesity.

 

Have A Happy & Healthy Life.

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